Industrial effluent treatment for sustainable water supply: A case study of Savannah sugar company, Numan, Adamawa State, Nigeria

  • O. M. Oraegbune O. M. Oraegbune* and S. Ashu Department of Building, Modibbo Adama University of Technology, Yola, Adamawa State, Nigeria.
  • S. Ashu Department of Building, Modibbo Adama University of Technology, Yola, Adamawa State, Nigeria.

Abstract

One characteristics peculiar to man is that he progressively changes his environment to meet his biological and social needs. On a social organized basis, man provides himself with the materials necessary for life which he removed initially as raw materials from his environment. By the provision and utilization of these deposited materials, that are worthless and sometimes harmful by-products on the environment, that causes these problems. The aim of this research is to ascertain the environmental problems caused by these discharges and develop or acquire knowledge of the adverse long term effects of untreated or partially treated wastewater containing algae putrients; non-degradable organics and heavy metals which will hasten the deterioration of receiving water bodies. The data for this study were collected through rate of flow of wastewater from various treatment plants. Samples of the generated data were analyzed by the use of the following; Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD), Suspended Solids (SS), pH and Temperature. The results obtained from the analysis shows that conventional wastewater treatment methods are capable of reducing the Carboceous BOD by more than 90% using a 9 day detention time for the ponds.

Published
Sep 3, 2018
How to Cite
ORAEGBUNE, O. M.; ASHU, S.. Industrial effluent treatment for sustainable water supply: A case study of Savannah sugar company, Numan, Adamawa State, Nigeria. Arid Zone Journal of Engineering, Technology and Environment, [S.l.], v. 14, n. 3, p. 515-532, sep. 2018. ISSN 2545-5818. Available at: <http://www.azojete.com.ng/index.php/azojete/article/view/476>. Date accessed: 25 mar. 2019.
Section
Articles